Ear wax removal for Teignmouth

Tegnmouth, Devon, South Devon, Torbay hearing, Torquay hearing,Exeter ear wax removal, Exeter hearing aids,

Ear wax removal for the Teignmouth area

 

If you are looking for the premier ear wax removal service in the south Devon area that covers Torbay, Teghnmouth, Torquay and beyond, then we are the place. The Honiton Hearing Centre, a well established ear wax and hearing aid centre.

 

Ear wax removal for Wells Somerset

We have a large hearing clinic based in Honiton but we cover all of South Devon including South Hams, Exeter, Kingsbridge, Totnes.  We conduct hearing tests and have a large selection of every hearing aid batter known to mankind. We also have Somerset covered for ear wax removal and hearing aids. The Keynsham hearing centre covers the whole of Somerset including Bath, Bristol, Wells, Taunton, Radstock, W.S.M.

 

Ear Wax Removal News:

 

Starkey Launches Livio AI Hearing Aid with Integrated Sensors and Artificial Intelligence

Starkey Livio AI.

Tegnmouth, Devon, South Devon, Torbay hearing, Torquay hearing,Exeter ear wax removal, Exeter hearing aids,

Ear wax removal in Teghnmouth Devon

Starkey® Hearing Technologies is said to have “reinvented both the hearing experience and the hearing aid” with Livio AI. Livio AI is reportedly “the world’s first” Healthable™ hearing aid to utilize integrated sensors and artificial intelligence and the first device to track physical activity and cognitive health as measured by hearing aid use in social situations, Starkey announced.

The launch also includes a brand-new mobile app—Thrive™ Hearing—and three new wireless accessories, the Starkey Hearing Technologies TV, the Remote, and the Remote Microphone +. With the Remote Micorophone+, Livio AI is also the first hearing aid to feature Amazon® Alexa connectivity.

“First and foremost, Livio AI is the best performing and best sounding hearing aid we have ever made,” said Starkey Hearing Technologies President Brandon Sawalich. “What makes today a pivotal moment in the hearing industry, is that with Livio AI, we have transformed a single-use device into the world’s first multi-purpose hearing aid, a Healthable with integrated sensors and artificial intelligence. Livio AI is so much more than just a hearing aid, it is a gateway to better health and wellness.”

According to Starkey, the new Hearing Reality™ technology is said to provide an average 50% reduction in noisy environments, significant reduced listening effort, and newly enhanced clarity of speech, while the use of artificial intelligence and integrated sensors enables it to help optimize the hearing experience.

Artificial intelligence and advancements in hearing technology enabled Livio AI to provide the following unique features and benefits, according to Starkey’s announcement:

  • Understand and see the real-time health benefits of using hearing aids
  • Overall health and wellness tracking through the app’s combined brain and body health score (Thrive Wellness Score)
  • Integration of the physical activity data measured by inertial sensors of the hearing aids with Apple Health and Google Fit apps
  • Personalized Control for customizable adjustments to sound and programs
  • Remote programming by users’ hearing professionals to put hearing healthcare in the hands of the users
  • Natural user interface with tap control
  • Unprecedented, natural listening, and speech clarity in the noisiest environments with the new Hearing Reality technology
  • Integrated language translation
  • Dual-radio wireless platform: 2.4GHz radio for streaming of phone calls, music, media, apps, and connecting with various devices including TVs and Amazon Alexa; near-field magnetic induction technology for true ear-to-ear communication and binaural noise reduction
  • Fall detection with inertial sensors integrated within the hearing aids (App support coming soon)

Teignmouth

Designed to help users live their healthiest life, Livio AI is available as a RIC 312 and BTE 13 in a variety of colors. In addition to the above features, Livio AI also includes Starkey’s feedback cancellation, high-definition music prescription, Multiflex Tinnitus Technology, and Surface™ NanoShield pioneering water, wax, and moisture repellant system to help protect and ensure durability and dependability.

How integrated sensors and AI helped Starkey transform the hearing aid

“Artificial intelligence, coupled with advanced sensing devices, is rapidly changing the world around us,” Starkey Hearing Technologies Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President of Engineering Achin Bhowmik said. “We are proud to introduce these transformational technologies into the world of hearing aids to both optimize the users’ hearing experiences and enable them to continuously monitor and improve their overall health besides treating hearing loss, reducing the associated risks of dementia, anxiety, and social isolation.”

The integrated 3D motion sensors inside Livio AI enable the hearing aids to detect movement, track activities, and recognize gestures. The hearing aids communicate with each other and compatible mobile accessories to deliver meaningful, real-time feedback about users’ overall body and cognitive health and fitness.

This technology may allow people to take a proactive and personal approach to treating hearing loss, which has been linked to various health issues including dementia, cognitive decline, anxiety, stress, social isolation, and an increased risk of falling.

Livio AI is reportedly the first device utilizing the ears to help users better understand not only how to improve their overall health and wellness, but also the deep connection between treating hearing loss and reducing health risks. This helps to improve key areas of wellbeing by reconnecting users to the people, places, and activities they love.

Livio AI is available in the United States and Canada at this time, with a global rollout to more than 20 countries in 2019. For more information about Livio AI hearing aids, the Thrive mobile app, and new Starkey Hearing Technologies accessories, visit www.starkey.com.

Also see Hearing Review’s follow-up article detailing Starkey’s launch of Livio AI.

Source: Starkey

 

 

 

Honiton hearing, Keynsham hearing

New Study Examines Inequality in Treatment for Hearing Loss

Ear-wax-removal-News:

Honiton hearing, Keynsham hearing

Ear-wax removal in Devon & Somerset.

Hearing loss seems like one of the great equalizers of old age, striking people of all kinds as their ears gradually lose the ability to pick out sounds or hear certain pitches.

But a new national study reveals major gaps in whether Americans over age 55 get help for their hearing loss—gaps that vary greatly by age, race, education, and income, according to an article published on the Michigan Medicine website.

In all, just over a third of older adults who say they have hearing loss are using a hearing aid to correct it, the study finds. But those who are non-Hispanic white, college educated, or have incomes in the top 25% were about twice as likely as those of other races, education levels, or income ranges to have a hearing aid.

The cost of hearing aids is most to blame, say the researchers from the University of Michigan who published the study in The Gerontologist. They presented it this week at the annual research meeting of the AcademyHealth professional society for health care researchers.

Hearing aids can cost thousands of dollars out of a patient’s pocket because most health insurance programs, including Medicare, don’t cover them.

In fact, the study finds that the only factor that leveled the playing field for hearing aid use was having insurance through the Department of Veterans Affairs, which covers hearing aids in many cases. Hearing-impaired veterans ages 55 to 64 were more than twice as likely as their nonveteran peers to use a hearing aid, even after the researchers corrected for other differences. The gap between veterans and nonveterans was also significant for those over 65.

But the detailed interviews conducted for the study also show that personal concerns about hearing aid use, and lack of engagement with health providers, play a role.

“Hearing aids are not easy for many to obtain due to their costs,” says Michael McKee, MD, MPH, the U-M family medicine physician and assistant professor who led the analysis.

Michael McKee, MD, MPH

Michael McKee, MD, MPH

“However, there are a number of additional issues that place at-risk groups at an even larger disadvantage to achieving good hearing health. Many of these issues are beyond the financial aspects, including racial/ethnicity and sociocultural elements, for instance stigma and vanity.”

National survey and local interviews

McKee, who uses a cochlear implant to overcome his own hearing loss, worked on the study with Helen Levy, PhD, a health economist and professor at the U-M Institute for Social Research, and other colleagues. The authors are members of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

They used survey data from the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study, which is based on interviews conducted by the Institute for Social Research with funding from the National Institutes of Health.

The analysis included data from more than 35,500 people nationwide over age 55 who said they had hearing loss. In addition, McKee and colleagues conducted in-depth interviews with 21 other older adults with hearing loss in the communities surrounding the university.

The authors conclude that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Servicesshould consider covering hearing aids for Medicare participants and those in Medicaid plans for lower-income adults of any age. Some state Medicaid plans do cover hearing aids, but it is not required.

“Many people may not realize that Medicare does not cover hearing aids,” says Levy. “But it doesn’t, so cost can be a significant obstacle preventing older adults with hearing loss from getting the help that they need.”

More findings from the study:

  • The percentage of older adults with hearing loss who used a hearing aid rose with age, from about 15% of those in their late 50’s to more than 57% of those in their late 80s.
  • Forty percent of non-Hispanic white adults with hearing loss used a hearing aid, compared with 18.4% of non-Hispanic black and 21.1% of Hispanic adults with hearing loss.
  • Nearly 46% of hearing-impaired older adults who had gone to college reported that they used a hearing aid, compared with just under 29% of those who hadn’t graduated from high school.
  • Nearly half of those with incomes in the top 25% wore a hearing aid, compared with about one-quarter of those in the bottom 25%.
  • There were no significant differences in hearing aid use based on the size of the community where the person lived, nor their level of health literacy as measured on a standard test.
  • Interviews showed that cost, lack of insurance coverage (or knowledge about insurance coverage), vanity, and stigma were common reasons for not using hearing aids. Participants also cited a lack of attention to hearing loss by their primary care provider and worries about finding an audiologist they could trust.
  • Many interview participants who used a hearing aid mentioned efforts that hearing-related professionals made to connect them to discounts and insurance programs.

More about hearing loss

Estimates of hearing loss incidence place it at 29% of people in their 50s, 45% of those in their 60s, 68% of those in their 70s, and 89% of those in their 80s.

Previous studies have shown that untreated hearing loss reduces older adults’ ability to carry out everyday tasks, reduces their quality of life, and is linked to social isolation, lower income, reduced cognitive function, and poorer physical and psychological health.

A recent study led by McKee’s colleague Elham Mahmoudi, PhD, found that having a hearing aid was associated with a lower chance of being hospitalized or visiting an emergency room in the past year. That study focused on people over 65 who had severe hearing loss, and it used data from a federal database.

McKee leads the Health Info Lab, which is researching health information use and literacy among deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals.

This article is copyrighted by the University of Michigan and used with permission.

Original Paper: McKee MM, Choi H, Wilson S, DeJonckheere MJ, Zazove P, Levy H. Determinants of hearing aid use among older Americans with hearing loss. The Gerontologist. 2018. Available at: https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/geront/gny051/5000029?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Source: Michigan Medicine/University of Michigan, The Gerontologist

Image: University of Michigan

http://www.keynshamhearing.co.uk

https://ear-wax-removal.co.uk

http://www.honiton-hearing.co.uk

Cheapest wax removal in the Somerset and Devon areas

earwax removal,Somerset, Devon

New Hearing Devices in Development May Expand Range of Human Hearing

Earwax removal in the Somerset and Devon area.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are developing atomically thin ‘drumheads’ able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear, the University announced in a press release.

But the drumhead is tens of trillions times (10 followed by 13 zeros) smaller in volume and 100,000 times thinner than the human eardrum.

It’s been said that the advances will likely contribute to making the next generation of ultralow-power communications and sensory devices smaller and with greater detection and tuning ranges.

“Sensing and communication are key to a connected world,” said Philip Feng, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and corresponding author on a paper about the work published March 30 in the journal Science Advances. “In recent decades, we have been connected with highly miniaturized devices and systems, and we have been pursuing ever-shrinking sizes for those devices.”

The challenge with miniaturization: Also achieving a broader dynamic range of detection, for small signals, such as sound, vibration, and radio waves.

“In the end, we need transducers that can handle signals without losing or compromising information at both the ‘signal ceiling’ (the highest level of an undistorted signal) and the ‘noise floor’ (the lowest detectable level),” Feng said.

While this work was not geared toward specific devices currently on the market, researchers said, it was focused on measurements, limits, and scaling which would be important for essentially all transducers.

Those transducers may be developed over the next decade, but for now, Feng and his team have already demonstrated the capability of their key components—the atomic layer drumheads or resonators—at the smallest scale yet.

The work represents the highest reported dynamic range for vibrating transducers of their type. To date, that range had only been attained by much larger transducers operating at much lower frequencies—like the human eardrum, for example.

“What we’ve done here is to show that some ultimately miniaturized, atomically thin electromechanical drumhead resonators can offer remarkably broad dynamic range, up to ~110dB, at radio frequencies (RF) up to over 120MHz,” Feng said. “These dynamic ranges at RF are comparable to the broad dynamic range of human hearing capability in the audio bands.”

New dynamic standard

Feng said the key to all sensory systems, from naturally occurring sensory functions in animals to sophisticated devices in engineering, is that desired dynamic range.

Dynamic range is the ratio between the signal ceiling over the noise floor and is usually measured in decibels (dB).

Human eardrums normally have dynamic range of about 60 to 100dB in the range of 10Hz to 10kHz, and our hearing quickly decreases outside this frequency range. Other animals, such as the common house cat or beluga whale, can have comparable or even wider dynamic ranges in higher frequency bands.

The vibrating nanoscale drumheads developed by Feng and his team are made of atomic layers of semiconductor crystals (single-, bi-, tri-, and four-layer MoS2 flakes, with thickness of 0.7, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 nanometers), with diameters only about 1 micron.

They construct them by exfoliating individual atomic layers from the bulk semiconductor crystal and using a combination of nanofabrication and micromanipulation techniques to suspend the atomic layers over microcavities predefined on a silicon wafer, and then making electrical contacts to the devices.

Further, these atomically thin RF resonators being tested at Case Western Reserve show excellent frequency ‘tunability,’ meaning their tones can be manipulated by stretching the drumhead membranes using electrostatic forces, similar to the sound tuning in much larger musical instruments in an orchestra, Feng said.

The study also reveals that these incredibly small drumheads only need picoWatt (pW, 10^-12 Watt) up to nanoWatt (nW, 10^-9 Watt) level of RF power to sustain their high frequency oscillations.

“Not only having surprisingly large dynamic range with such tiny volume and mass, they are also energy-efficient and very ‘quiet’ devices,” Feng said. “We ‘listen’ to them very carefully and ‘talk’ to them very gently.”

The paper’s co-authors were: Jaesung Lee, a Case Western Reserve post-doctoral research associate; Max Zenghui Wang, a former research associate now at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, China; Keliang He, a former graduate student in physics, now a senior engineer at Nvidia; Rui Yang, a former graduate student and now a post-doctoral scholar at Stanford University; and Jie Shan, a former physics professor at Case Western Reserve now at Cornell University.

The work has been financially supported by the National Academy of Engineering Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Award (Grant: FOE 2013-005) and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (Grant: ECCS-1454570).

Original Paper: Lee J, Wang Z, He K, Yang R, Shan J, Feng PX-L. Electrically tunable single- and few-layer MoS2nanoelectromechanical systems with broad dynamic rangeScience Advances. 2018;4(3):eaao6653.

Source: Case Western Reserve University, Science Advances

www.keynshamhearing.co.uk

www.honiton-hearing.co.uk

www.devonhearingcare.co.uk

Starkey Hearing Technologies Launches IQ Product Lines

earwax-removal-south-west-england

Starkey Hearing Technologies Launches IQ Product Lines

Published on 

iQ Product Family

Starkey Hearing Technologies—an Eden Prairie, Minn-based hearing technology company—is launching a new line of hearing aids based on the company’s research in virtual reality, advanced neuroscience, and audiology and signal processing, Starkey announced. Designed to create an immersive hearing experience for patients, the iQ product lines include: Muse iQ, a complete line of 900sync™ technology, wireless hearing aids; SoundLens Synergy iQ, a new invisible-in-the-canal hearing aid; Halo iQ, smartphone-compatible hearing aids; and the brand-new TruLink Remote.

Muse iQ_Details(1)

“As part of our commitment to lead the world in hearing innovation, we are excited to share the results of our collaboration with the world’s top researchers in today’s most advanced technologies,” Starkey Hearing Technologies President Brandon Sawalich said. “By working closely with leading researchers in the fields of neuroscience, virtual reality, and audiology and signal processing to integrate advancements into our award-winning products, we can now provide patients with new levels of presence, clarity, personalization, and other benefits previously unattainable with traditional hearing devices.”

iQ Family_IIC_RIC_312T_mini_BTE_312_micro_RIC_312T_CIC

New Features with Acuity OS 2, Inspired by Virtual Reality Research

Built with Starkey Hearing Technologies’ proven Synergy platform and Acuity™ OS 2 operating system, the iQ technologies include a suite of new features that deliver the presence, clarity, and personalization patients have previously missed during the moments that matter most, the company said. Four of the most notable new features include:

  • Acuity Immersion – Designed to leverage microphone placement to aid with high-frequency information for improved sound quality and sense of special awareness, this technology has the potential to help patients relearn key acoustic brain cues to support clear speech, a sense of presence, and spatial attention for connection to their environment. Acuity Immersion takes the key natural cues needed for spatial awareness and shifts them to provide the wearer with both clear speech and a sense of presence and connection to their environment. By giving the wearer’s brain access to these cues, iQ hearing aids can help wearers’ brains relearn these key cues and thereby reassert spatial perception.
  • Acuity Immersion Directionality – Designed to restore front-to-back cues for a more natural, safer listening experience.
  • Speech Indicators for memory – Provide descriptive names for memory environments rather than numeric indicators.
  • Smart VC – Allows for an increase in gain in all channels not already at maximum, to give wearers a desired increase in loudness when needed.

TruLink Details(1)

“The iQ line represents a brand-new dimension in hearing technology research and innovation,” Starkey Hearing Technologies Chief Technology Officer and Executive Vice President of Engineering Achin Bhowmik said. “We anticipate that our new products will have a dramatic impact on our patients’ lives—and change the game in the global hearing aid industry.”

iQ_Synergy Platorm Family

 

Muse iQ, Muse iQ CROS and SoundLens Synergy iQ

Designed to provide high-quality, natural sound in even the most challenging environments, Muse iQ and SoundLens Synergy iQ hearing aids offer audibility and streaming for individuals with single-sided hearing loss, said Starkey. All Muse iQ and SoundLens Synergy iQ devices work with SurfLink wireless accessories to provide ear-to-ear streaming of calls, music and media, remote hearing aid control, and a personalized hearing experience.

SoundLens iQ Synergy_Details(1)

Muse iQ hearing aids are available in both custom and standard styles, and the Muse iQ micro RIC 312t is also available in a rechargeable option. Finally, Muse iQ CROS and BiCROS systems offer audibility and streaming for individuals with single-sided hearing loss.

SoundLens Synergy iQ hearing aids offer wearers an invisible, custom fit hearing solution featuring Starkey Hearing Technologies’ advanced technology and sound quality.

Halo iQ and the NEW TruLink Remote 

Powered by Starkey Hearing Technologies’ TruLink 2.4 GHz wireless hearing technology, Halo iQ smartphone-compatible hearing aids enable connectivity with iPhone, iPad®, iPod touch®, Apple Watch®, and select Android™ devices.

Halo iQ_Details

A brand-new wireless accessory, the TruLink Remote is compatible with Apple® or Android and works without a smartphone.

Source: Starkey Hearing Technologies

Images: Starkey Hearing Technologies